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to meet you. >> gary john soon? no. after wednesday night you have to be -- [inaudible] on that. [inaudible conversations] >> good to see you. aren't you glad i'm not blaming you. i was explaining what i came out -- it's rude to look at the launch in the middle of the interview. it's like a half hour later and you were -- [inaudible conversations] [inaudible] why haven't you -- [inaudible] >> that's great. i'll be in new york for that. hello. i'll see you later. [inaudible conversations] >> have you read it? >> no. you sent it to us. i know. thank you. [inaudible conversations] [inaudible] he changed his e-mail address. you are e-mailing me and you're not e-mailing me back. >> i hnlt planned to say anything. but since i'm late my publishers -- told me it would be polite for me to say something. i want to start off by saying his fault that i was late. that's the most important thing. it's not my fault. thank you so much for all coming tonight. you won't see anything about the book in my of the mainstream media except the "the view," i love those gals. [laughter] i really, really
but organizing this talk. and john phillips, a mechanical engineer, all over the world who is here and advised me on technical aspects of energy in the book and to read the will manuscript to check on scientific details of it. this is an appropriate day for talking about "regulating to disaster" because president obama promised once more to develop the energy sources of the future. when any administration, republican or democrat decides to develop energy projects, taxpayers had better watch out. governments get in the business of picking winners and losers which leads to cronyism and wasted taxpayer dollars. this is the question of industrial policy, whether government should support business ventures in new technologies that are unable to secure private funding. government appears to be worse at this than private markets from the records we have over the past five years. in contrast in a speech in california in may, mitt romney said, quote, the president doesn't understand when you invest like that in one solar energy company it makes it harder for solar technology generally because the other en
on booktv, a presentation of this year's paolucci bagehot book award winner, john fonte, author of "sovereignty or submission." during the dinner mr. fonte delivered a lecture based on his book. it's a little over an hour. [applause] >> thank you, mark. i'm very honored, and it's very flattering to be in such good company in previous winners of the paolucci/bagehot award. it's also a great honor to receive this from the intercollegiate studies institute which has done wonderful work in sustaining the core principles of american civic life. i also wish to extend condolences to the isa community for the recent loss of a greaptd lady and scholar, ann paolucci. finally, i'd like to acknowledge that henry paolucci was a stalwart defender of american national sovereignty, and i hope that -- he would have been pleased in presenting this award to me, as pleased as i am in receiving this. i'm going to proceed as follows. : first, i'm going to talk a little bit about what i call philadelphia sovereignty. second, i'm going to examine the ideas of the global governance project which challen
that we are making, it is called desperate sons, "samuel adams, patrick henry, john hancock, and the secret bands of radicals who led the colonies to war". thank you, and i know you're going to enjoy the presentation. [applause] [applause] >> thank you. i am david nasaw and i am absolutely delighted to be here. the sun does not shine like it does here in other places. as i tell my history students until they want to choke me, the past is a foreign country. we can visit their, we can try to learn the costumes, we can translate the language, we can feel the air in the light. we can sniff the pregnancies and recoil at the foul orders. we are foreigners in a strange land. writing about the recent past is not easy. as i learned this time around. first, there are people you talk to. while i was privileged to talk to a a lot of kennedys, it was difficult for me as a historian working with living people. i would much prefer to work with documents. with living people, you can't tell, but you have to figure out what is true, what is not true, what are they tell you, whether they thin
and iraq when george w. bush ran for the reelection against john kerry for the voters by a small margin seemed to believe bush would be the better leader. it cannot be said that the vote reflected the favorable referendum on george of the bush's first term. the importance of the communication skill of the candidate cannot be discounted as a factor, however. but all of this misses a different evaluation that merits being taken into account in the incumbent barack obama and his challenger mitt romney. that is the jinx of the second term on so many presidents. only seven of 19 presidents elected to a second term avoided having a troubled or failed second term. that would give the country's 38% chance of obama and the nation experiencing the economic climate if obama is reelected. do not suggest the gamble shouldn't be taken. rather it is playing with politics might give us cause. what is the history project about a second term for barack obama were he free elective with so few presidents having success in that time in office. one of the challenges that face those that have troubled or fail
, 1826, john adams receives a group of visitors in his upstairs library the town leaders of quincy organizing the upcoming anniversary of the declaration of independence and they are known from out as the office for independence. they asked him for a toast to be read to the celebrants on july july 4th from 1826 and adam replies independence forever. he says not a word. so i have nothing more to say except independence forever. the united states seems to be leading the charge of looking at liberal democrats such as hillary clinton and also the neocons and the invasion of iraq and most recently the globalist obama and the invasion of libya so my question is here we have the united states tonight and the sovereignty of other nations and that is a problem when we have two parties with both essentially are war parties. >> in my book i distinguish between sovereignty in general which would be the sovereignty currently of the burmese or any autocratic state and i call them the philadelphians but there are other democratic sovereign states that make that distinction to be the democratic so
the second volume we are working on now. as john mentioned, this is volume one deficit to 1945 and volume two will be out about this time next year, 1946 to president. i have to warn readers, such as those who see me speak before probably know me for a little more lighthearted insertion, but this is instead dominated by two unspeakably deadly wars sandwiched around a nearly worldwide depression and characterized by such villains as miscellany, stallman and hitler. i don't even think joe biden cannot get that material. while we have some sidebar section, one of my favorite is a comparison and contrast between the world are to puncture the architects of the day, tony gaudi walter gropius who epitomize nature, god and man and not order a robert pires during race for the north pole. the bulk of this book is dedicated to those political forces that reshape the century. as one who gravitates the great gary, osama said above servers last week at a book signing event when a questioner asked me, who's the most person in your vote? it dawned on me this really isn't a book about the most important peopl
his picture taken with, alongside of john f. kennedy. is so proud. he is so proud. and he is already dedicated to the idea that he is going to be the person who is going to bring complete honor to the family. it already, by the age of 17, is planning to be elected attorney general of arkansas, then governor of arkansas, and president of the united states. this is something which everyone who knows him knows about. he talks about it all the time. it is not go to the university of arkansas, he goes to georgetown. and from georgetown he becomes the arkansas candidate for the rhodes scholarship and goes to oxford. he is an incredible success everywhere, but he cannot have a sustained ongoing relationship with a woman. he is attracted to the kind of women his mother directs him to, who are the beauty queens, who are the ones who are flirtatious, who are attractive, and that's really where his eyes have been. until he comes back to you law school. there he meets hillary brought them. >> you can watch this and other programs online at o
of actually and john updike, it's been some amateur psychologist wrote that they have pressure on the cortex, these people, where there's, eloquence is pressing down on them and this would have to release it as an underground whale would release water. it's they can't not do it. john wrote 100 books in his life, and fantastic, quality. and you just have two bow out and hold their code while they do that. you can't compete. >> he was also, surprisingly, when he would deliver whether a manuscript or his essays as well for various publications, his objective come to turn in his piece in the mighty one of two things he would aggressively fight for, but what sort turn it over and let you do -- there was nothing to do really. >> there was nothing to do but often as editors they say we need to cut 1000 words for ads or perfume do whatever. he would you say okay, and he would find it and get rid of it. he was completely open discussion. not to say he didn't value his work when he was asked. it's just that was part of the craft and the work of having signed up for certain publications. >> you and i'v
writing about james garfield, david nassau on joseph kennedy and samuel adams, patrick henry and john hancock. .. we had down here this weekend. we will be live all week. about hundred thousand people attend this event every year as well as about 350 authors are down here. was founded by mr. kaplan, founder of books and books as well. the big bookstore down here in south florida. well, the c-span buses also year, and we are handing out but banks with our partners comcast here in the miami area. if you happen to be in the area, come on down. we are at miami-dade college the north side of downtown miami for the miami book fair. in just a minute the panel in chapman all here at miami-dade college will begin -- will be beginning. dave barry in the onion editors, humor columnist solve them. there will be introduced by brad meltzer who will be moderating the panel. the novelist will be joining us later. ms. kaplan will also be speaking, the founder of the miami book fair, introducing and opening the weekend coverage. in just a minute we'll take you now to chapman all. it's rather full. we w
socialism and john mccain's cap-and-trade plan, and lots of things in the stimulus, things like a smart grid, electronic health records, extending unemployment benefits, never had been controversial before. the -- so the good news is the fever could break; right? certainly, mitch mcconnell said his top priority would be keeping obama a one-term president. not anymore. you need a different priority now. [applause] but, you know the problem is the incentive structure for republicans. as, you know, i'm not the first to point out, in the book, about how they shed their moderates as they've become more and more dependent on tea party voters. you know, mitch mcconnell has to worry about a primary collage in 2014, and boehner has to worry about a leadership challenge from the right so there's certainly a primp on what they can do. that said, the incentives have changed, and you saw chris christie's incentive changed, and there's, you know, the fiscal cliff creates different incentives, and i think the end of -- the end of that one term goal means that different republicans will start to have differ
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11

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